REVIEW: Batman and Two-Face #26

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It’s double trouble as Batman investigates Harvey Dent’s past to try to find him in the present—but is he ready to face the dark truth behind Two-Face’s origin?

SUMMARY

Pros
Another strong member of the Bat-family of books.
Both art and script are powerful and interesting.
Cons
I would have preferred less dialogue, but I still contend that Tomasi does a great job with entertaining us through his choice of words.

Overall Rating: ★★★★☆

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BATMAN AND TWO-FACE #26
Writer: Peter J. Tomasi
Artists: Patrick Gleason and Mick Gray
Publisher: DC Comics

Cover Price: $2.99

Previously in BATMAN AND … : “As Two-Face continues his rampage through Gotham City, more light is shed on his past.”

SOMETIMES A NEW CHARACTER CAN BRING ANOTHER’S HISTORY TO LIGHT

Erin McKillen has been seen in the last few issues of Batman and … , and she’s been an interesting addition in that we’re not only learning about her, but we’re also getting more information about Bruce Wayne and Harvey Dent.

I found it intriguing that Erin’s sister Shannon was actually someone Bruce could talk to. Sadly, she’s no longer with us, and the way she died is just one of the things we learn about in this issue.

We also get to meet another member of the McKillen clan, and he’s just as dependable as his sister is.

TOMASI DOES A GREAT JOB OF WRITING BATMAN

Peter Tomasi is one of my favorite scripters on Batman these days, especially when it comes to his dialogue. One of my favorite bits from this book has Alfred telling Erin just what he thinks of her. “You’re a vile and detestable young woman who deserves to be locked away in a black hole.” Erin responds, “Thanks for sharing.”

My only concern with this issue was that there seemed to actually be too much dialogue in places. Granted, it fit, but I would have preferred somewhat less talking this month.

Tomasi also keeps the pacing moving rapidly even during the dramatic sequences. He also injects a bit of Bat-humor in the first few pages when Erin makes a request of Bruce. Made me laugh out loud!

I’ve also always felt that Two-Face needs more attention. There’s a fascinating panel in which Harvey Dent, before he becomes a master criminal, looks through a glass that’s cracked right down the middle. Yikes!

The Batman action takes place later in the issue, and I enjoyed it a lot. I feel for Bruce/Batman, who is always trying to rescue his previous friend from the madness he finds himself in. Sadly, I doubt he’ll ever recover. But he will be an interesting foe for the Dark Knight to take on in that Bruce has a personal stake in Two-Face, unlike many of the other baddies he takes on.

As far as the book’s title, Batman and … , I still long for the day when Damien Wayne returns from the dead to take his place at Batman’s side. And when I first met the character, I NEVER thought I’d feel that way! Until then, it’ll be an interesting team-up comic for the Dark Knight.

GLEASON’S ART COMPLIMENTS TOMASI’S WRITING

I think that Patrick Gleason’s art is perfect for portraying Batman. After all, it’s kind of dark and craggy around the edges, which fits the Dark Knight to a “T,” in my opinion.

Both facial expressions and action sequences work extremely well. There’s an example in this issue when Batman appears on his Bat-Cycle. That panel is so strong that I went, “Whoa!” when I saw it. Nicely done!

BOTTOM LINE: BATMAN AND … CONTINUES TO BE A STRONG MEMBER OF THE FAMILY OF BAT-BOOKS

I’ve long said that Batman is soaring high right now, pun intended. Batman and … , which used to give us more of Robin’s perspective, is back looking at Bruce’s point of view. And the creative team continues to flesh out more about Batman and his supporting cast.

For a long-term Bat-fan like myself, it can’t get much better with this group of comics. I can think of only one way right now – bring on Batman: Eternal, the weekly series debuting in early 2014!

Rating: ★★★★☆