Harley Quinn #2 Review

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After getting a job as a roller derby girl, Harley Quinn and her zany antics return.  What will she do now?  Rescue puppies and kittens of course!  Major Spoilers cracks issue two open and see if this silliness still holds up.

Harley Quinn_2_coverHARLEY QUINN #2
Writer: Amanda Conner, Jimmy Palmiotti
Artist: Chad Hardin, Stephane Roux
Letterer: John J. Hill
Colorist: Alex Sinclair
Editor: Katie Kubert
Publisher: DC Comics
Cover Price: $2.99

Previously in Harley Quinn: After inheriting a building, Harley had to get some jobs. Luckily/Unfortunately, she found one as a psychiatrist and another on a roller derby team. Along with collecting rent from her tenants, she has to deal with pesky hit men trying to kill her.

WELL, IVY SURE SHOWED UP QUICK

I absolutely loved the first issue but after talking to some people at the store, many found it too be too silly; some going as far as to call it stupid. That’s actually what I liked, finding it a fun change of pace from the doom and gloom in a majority of DC’s books as of late. Most of the female customers liked it and were quite excited though, which I found interesting. Regardless, I had to check out issue two and while the fun and looniness continue, it doesn’t quite hit as well as the first.

The majority of the issue is spent with Poison Ivy helping Harley free a bunch of animals from a euthanizing shelter. Needless to say, it’s another ridiculous situation but entertaining with some good humor. Harley and Ivy’s interaction is extremely well done and Conner and Palmiotti do a great job of showing how much the two care for each other, even hinting at the romantic/sexual relationship which I appreciated. I did feel Ivy’s appearance took some of the spark and attention away from Harley. I understand Ivy is a big part of Harley’s life but it’s only issue two and we’re already having guest stars? The tone of the first issue continues and but there are some missteps along the way. Focus is lost as the search for the animals is quickly interrupted by Harley taking out a hit man. Personally, I’d much rather have another absurd done-in-one than adding the mystery subplot as well. Many jokes work but some not as well thought out. Having Harley, a murderous psychopath, walk into the shelter and fill out a form unnoticed is questionable at best. While the scene’s joke is funny, it may have worked better had she been in disguise. It fits the insane nature but, like the roller derby scene in issue one, is a bit of a stretch. Still, I quite enjoyed the book as a light-hearted series that’s doing a great job separating itself from the other DC titles.

WELL, A SECOND ARTIST SURE SHOWED UP QUICK

Chad Hardin’s work on issue one was amazing to say the least and I was extremely surprised (and somewhat disappointed) to see another artist already having to help. That’s not to snub Stephane Roux’s work at all, quite the opposite actually. He’s as strong, meshing well with Hardin and the coloring helps. Roux brings the needed energy and comical nature needed for a book of this kind. His style matches the story’s tone better than Hardin’s, but I loved his so much I wanted to see more. Hopefully he can maintain a monthly schedule as it strengthens the book, but it’s not looking good. If Stephane Roux ends up taking over, I’ll in no way be upset as he’s incredibly talented himself.

BOTTOM LINE: STILL STRONG ENOUGH FOR A BUY

Harley Quinn fans will unlikely be let down by this issue and it continues to be a wonderfully fun read. While this issue has some problems in the story and the need for a supporting artist is unfortunate, it still manages to come out ahead. It continues to be a great alternative to other DC books and I can see the appeal for female readers. That’s wonderful as female readership needs to continue to grow. Harley Quinn #2 comes highly recommended and is worth a buy, just don’t take it too seriously.