Hawkeye’s latest outing bears a strong resemblance to previous comics featuring the archer. But is it the same level of quality? Let’s find out in Hawkeye: Freefall #5 from Marvel Comics.

HAWKEYE: FREEFALL #5

Author: Matthew Rosenberg
Illustrator: Otto Schmidt
Colorist: Otto Schmidt
Letterer: VC’s Joe Sabino
Editor: Alanna Smith
Publisher: Marvel
Cover Price: $3.99
Release Date: May 20, 2020

SOLICITATION: Hawkeye’s relationship to Ronin has even his friends turning against him. He’s been lying about a lot of things. But you can’t lie to Captain America. Meanwhile, his war with the Hood is beginning to spin out of control as the people close to him are put in real danger. Having to deal with the Hood was bad enough, but now Clint finds himself in the sites of another former Hawkeye. No. Not her… Enter BULLSEYE.

HAWKEYE AND RONIN

It’s always been something I’ve wondered over time. If you have one masked identity, and it works, why not two? That’s kind of the story in this latest incarnation of Hawkeye.

He’s the guy known to the Avengers as Hawkeye, but he’s also someone else, and that person isn’t limited by expectations. Ronin can punch and kick his way through the underworld, and it doesn’t mean a thing. If Hawkeye did the same thing, well, there would be a public backlash, him being an Avenger and all.

The problem Hawkeye has is that he’s become well known among the heroes in New York City. And some of them can tell when something just doesn’t feel right. Like, say, Captain America, for instance. And, as the promo says, you can’t lie to Cap, right? Not in front of Spider-Man, right?

This issue has lots of action, including the aforementioned punching and kicking. Ronin takes on a battle zone, expecting to win some money, but he does too good a job of it. After a round or two, people don’t bet against him because he wins too convincingly. Then Hawkeye takes on some of The Hood’s goons in a dining area, and that’s got lots of the aforementioned punching and kicking, too.

It all leads to a nasty cliffhanger ending, but you can’t believe everything you read, right? We’ll see what happens in issue #6.

It was nice to read a new Marvel issue for a change. It’s been weeks to months, and things still could move forward unevenly, so we need to enjoy them while we can.

I have long enjoyed Mr. Rosenberg’s scripting and characterization, and he doesn’t disappoint here. Fun stuff!

ART MADE FOR PUNCHING AND KICKING

As I always say, I break down a comic’s art on two levels—facial expressions and action sequences. Since there is a lot of fighting in this book, that level of the art works extremely well. It’s a lot of fists flying and people getting knocked around, and who doesn’t enjoy that in a comic?

The problem I have with this comic is the facials expressions. A lot of the times, when Hawkeye grimaces, it looks a lot like when The Hood grimaces. Granted, I can still tell who is who and all, but I prefer my art when the same expression doesn’t end up on different faces, even when they are experiencing the same feelings.

BOTTOM LINE: Hitting the ‘Bullseye’

This issue comes to a conclusion that indicates the return of Bullseye. I’m intrigued that Bullseye really has gotten popular among Marvel books these days, seems to me. If I remember correctly, Daredevil took on Bullseye a lot in the past, and he’s just the first I can recall off the top of my head. Maybe Bullseye should be the next character to get a monthly book?

The tone and the feel of this series is very reminiscent of the popular version from Fraction and Aja. I guess that there is considered to be some life left in this mode of storytelling!

I have to say that after five issues of this storyline, I’m anxious for it to conclude sometime soon. There’s more to Hawkeye than a lot of people give him credit for, so I’d like to see him do something else. And I’m sorry that we need Spidey and Cap around, which seems like they’re here to boost sales. I want to see more about Clint and his story, please?


Dear Spoilerite,

At Major Spoilers, we strive to create original content that you find interesting and entertaining. Producing, writing, recording, editing, and researching requires significant resources. We pay writers, podcast hosts, and other staff members who work tirelessly to provide you with insights into the comic book, gaming, and pop culture industries. Help us keep MajorSpoilers.com strong. Become a Patron (and our superhero) today.

Hawkeye Freefalling, all right!

53%
53%
Hawkeye and Ronin

It was nice to read a new Marvel issue for a change. It’s been weeks to months, and things still could move forward unevenly, so we need to enjoy them while we can. I have long enjoyed Mr. Rosenberg’s scripting and characterization, and he doesn’t disappoint here. Fun stuff!

  • Writing
    7
  • Art
    4
  • Coloring
    5
  • User Ratings (1 Votes)
    9.9
Share.

About Author

Wayne Hall creates the Wayne's Comics Podcast. He’s interviewed Scott Snyder, Greg Capullo, John Layman, Kyle Higgins, Phil Hester, Jimmy Palmiotti & Justin Gray, David Petersen, Christos Gage, Mike Grell, and Matt Kindt. On this site each week, he writes his "Comics Portal" column (general comics comments and previews) and reviews comics.

1 Comment

  1. David Tilden on

    This review says almost nothing but positive things about the book and then gives it a 53? WTF?

Leave A Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.