Detective Ash continues to investigate the disappearance of business tycoon Alexander Selwyn’s daughter and wife, only to find the trail seems to be leading to places better not explored. BLADE RUNNER 2019 #2 is on store shelves August 21 from Titans Comics.

BLADE RUNNER 2019 #2

Writer:  Michael Green, Mike Johnson
Artist:  Andres Guinaldo
Colorist:  Marco Lesko
Letterer:  Jim Campbell
Editor:  David Leach
Publisher:  Titan Comics
Cover Price:  $3.99
Release Date:  August 21, 2019

Previously in BLADE RUNNER 2019: After having complications arise out of her last replicant retirement, Detective and Blade Runner Aahna “Ash” Ashona of the LAPD is ordered to investigate the disappearance of Isobel and Cleo Selwyn, the wife and daughter of the powerful businessman Alexander Selwyn. After her efforts lead her the last known location of the Selwyn’s dead chauffeur and a decimated spinner, she suffered from a malfunction in her own cybernetic transplants. Meanwhile, the subject of her search has made contact with the man, Malek, who seems to offer them what they are searching for.

THE HUNT CONTINUES

The story of how Detective Ash received her cybernetic implants is a short one. Diagnosed as a child with a disease which would cause her spine to simply stop working, she was raised by her grandmother after her mother left for the stars to make the money to help her girl. At least that is the story her Nani told her. The truth can be guessed more than likely, but Ash is not one to dwell on the past, but to focus on the present. Presently, she continues to track down Isobel and Cleo Selwyn. The trail has led her to a low-rent chop shop, and the skin doctor who runs it. He easily confesses he spoke to the older of the two via the phone, but not much else. He tells Ash the woman said she was on her way home.

Meanwhile, Isobel is carrying her daughter through the underground tunnels of the city with Malek in the lead. She loves her daughter, but seems desperate to get her away from her father. This has led them to a refugee camp of sorts, where people who can’t make it anywhere else survive. Another surgeon, this one referred to as The Lung, tells her that The Skin let her know she would be arriving. They are short on time, and have to begin.

The skin doc may have not stated he had anything else to offer, but Detective Ash has been in the business long enough to know better. She follows him through the city using her police assets. This leads to an address at the Carleton apartments where she finds an older man awaiting his food. It doesn’t take long for her to realize everything is to perfect, too staged, and the man is a replicant. A bloody fight ensues before he escapes, and she is left to ponder a skin doctor who makes replicants look old as to pass themselves off as human. Pain aside, her night continues. There is more to this than Alexander Selwyn is admitting. Before her night is through she will find her trail leads to the dead and someone does not want her disturbing the past.

LIKE TEARS IN THE RAIN

The Blade Runner universe is one which has not been explored much outside of the two movies starring Harrison Ford, and as such it is a ripe, unexplored world waiting to have the corners filled. This series, which is considered in-canon, is doing a great job of that so far. Writers Michael Green (Superman/Batman, Supergirl) and Mike Johnson (Star Trek, Earth 2: Worlds End) have created a world which holds all the wonder of the original movies, and even more of the mystery. There is a strong feeling of tribute to this storyline, and this issue in particular, as Detective Ashona works her way through the leads only to find more questions than answers. There are multiple plots moving around and Ash herself is a wonderfully developed character who draws you into with her inner dialogue and interesting motives. The world on the page references the movie often and looks as if it would easily fit in right beside Decker and his story.

Artistically we have a wonderful match to the moving images which graced us over thirty-five plus years ago. Andres Guinaldo (Gotham Sirens, The Hypernaturals) brings his decidedly distinct style to the page with wonderfully detailed artwork which has a unique look and feel. He very easily be drawing concept work for a Blade Runner movie, as the feel is so right it makes you ache for more. Combined with the colors of Marco Lesko (Robotech, Assassin’s Creed: Uprising) it has a dreamlike, ethereal look that draws you in.

BOTTOM LINE: GRIPPING

The story of Ash and her hunt for the missing family continues here. It really draws you into a world of dark corners filled with illegal procedures and cyberpunk possibilities that first graced out imaginations in 1982. You feel for Isobel and her daughter, but her actions and dialogue make you wonder what secret is being hidden. There is a strong chance that Detective Ashona is not on the side she thinks she is and that possibility adds to the suspense of the tale.

This issue continues to delve into the world of Blade Runner 2019. It’s a gritty neo-noir cyberpunk dream at its best.

Blade Runner 2019 #2

83%
83%
Gripping

Great plotting, strong art, and an excellent voice all contribute to a great issue.

  • Writing
    8
  • Art
    9
  • Coloring
    8
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About Author

Back in February of 2008, Stacy Baugher wrote his first article for Major Spoilers and started a solid run of work that would last for over two years. He wrote the first series of Comic Casting Couch articles as well as multiple Golden Age Hero Histories, reviews and commentaries. After taking a hiatus from all things fandom he has returned to the Major Spoilers fold. He can currently be found on his blog, www.stacybaugher.com , were he post progress on his fiction work as well as his photography and life in general, and on Twitter under the handle @stacybaugher . If you're of a mind, he also takes on all comers with the under the Xbox Live Gamertag, Lost Hours. He currently lives in Clinton, Mississippi with his understanding wife, and two kids.

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