I realize that speech and language are complex matters full of subjectivity, so I try not to spend too much effort on policing the word usage of others.  That said, I really dislike the current online vernacular usage of “insane” as a universal adjective/intensifier.  It feels trite, meaningless and worst of all, overused, leaving me less interested in whatever is being described, which is the death knell for click bait.  There are a number of words that I overuse, I am aware, but the ubiquity of “insane” both puzzles and infuriates me, leading to today’s baffling query…

The MS-QOTD (pronounced, as always, “misquoted”) has one weird trick for faster browsing, asking: Which single word that no longer means what you think it means would you most like stricken from the language?

The Author

Matthew Peterson

Matthew Peterson

Once upon a time, there was a young nerd from the Midwest, who loved Matter-Eater Lad and the McKenzie Brothers... If pop culture were a maze, Matthew would be the Minotaur at its center. Were it a mall, he'd be the Food Court. Were it a parking lot, he’d be the distant Cart Corral where the weird kids gather to smoke, but that’s not important right now... Matthew enjoys body surfing (so long as the bodies are fresh), writing in the third person, and dark-eyed women. Amongst his weaponry are such diverse elements as: Fear! Surprise! Ruthless efficiency! An almost fanatical devotion to pop culture!

And a nice red uniform.

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9 Comments

  1. July 5, 2017 at 11:52 am — Reply

    Not stricken, but I’d love the use of the word “Literally” to be toned back to actually being used to describe something literal.

    • July 6, 2017 at 6:33 am — Reply

      Literally means figuratively now. Complete opposite.

  2. July 5, 2017 at 12:28 pm — Reply

    Epic

  3. July 5, 2017 at 3:10 pm — Reply

    Warrior.

  4. Daniel Langsdale
    July 5, 2017 at 3:44 pm — Reply

    “Huge”
    “Terrific”
    “Great”
    “Fake News”
    etc.

    Incidentally, I love the redundancy of following up “trite” with “meaningless” and “overused.” It makes me wonder at what point “trite” became trite.

    • July 5, 2017 at 6:46 pm — Reply

      Trite is really my favorite fish.*

      *Nerdtacular 2017 reference.

      • Brandon
        July 13, 2017 at 3:16 pm — Reply

        Is trite tart trout?

  5. Brandon
    July 13, 2017 at 3:20 pm — Reply

    Millennials

    The generational term applies to me but it also applies to what I would consider the following generation as well. It isn’t used accurately and is applied to an incredibly wide age range many of us are drastically different due to which decade we were born.

    On that same note outside of baby boomers (determined by the end of WWII) when did generations stop corresponding to a decade?

    • Brandon
      July 13, 2017 at 3:21 pm — Reply

      Apologies for my run on paragraph with some missed punctuation. I was trying to avoid seeing red.

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