If you were of a certain age (approximately 11 to 21) in the year 1987, there’s a pretty good chance that you’re a fan of ‘The Lost Boys’, a strange horror comedy that featured Kiefer Sutherland, both Coreys and Julia Roberts’ future ex-husband, as well as the effervescent Jami Gertz at her most hair-poofy.  It provided the soundtrack for most of ’88 and ’89 for me,as well as some truly memorable quotes and cinema moments (including a life-long crush on Dianne Wiest) but mostly it took the existing tropes and story-beats of old-school monster movies and remixed them for the Clinton years.  It’s interesting to see the old clichés (beat the head vampire and all others fall down; holy water, garlic and stakes; the mysterious underground lair) trotted out and mostly played straight, leaving me with an appreciation of how even silly or dated ideas can work if you commit to them, which leads us to today’s teen-Keifer-starring query…

The MS-QOTD (pronounced, as always, “misquoted”) also has a deep and abiding love for ‘Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein’, but not ‘Abbott & Costello Meet The Mummy’, ’cause the Mummy sucks, asking: What’s your favorite updated use of legendary monsters in modern stories ala ‘The Lost Boys?’

The Author

Matthew Peterson

Matthew Peterson

Once upon a time, there was a young nerd from the Midwest, who loved Matter-Eater Lad and the McKenzie Brothers... If pop culture were a maze, Matthew would be the Minotaur at its center. Were it a mall, he'd be the Food Court. Were it a parking lot, he’d be the distant Cart Corral where the weird kids gather to smoke, but that’s not important right now... Matthew enjoys body surfing (so long as the bodies are fresh), writing in the third person, and dark-eyed women. Amongst his weaponry are such diverse elements as: Fear! Surprise! Ruthless efficiency! An almost fanatical devotion to pop culture!

And a nice red uniform.

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5 Comments

  1. Ian
    August 31, 2014 at 2:05 pm — Reply

    Agyar by Steven Brust

  2. August 31, 2014 at 3:34 pm — Reply

    I’ve said it numerous times, but one of my all-time favorite TV shows was “Forever Knight”, which had it’s own vampire mythology that took ideas from the usual classic vampires (such as sunlight, crosses and such being harmful) and threw in a few twists, as well as including some ideas from vampire like creatures in other mythology.

    There was also a book series that came out in the mid/late 90’s that I really enjoyed but cannot for the life of me remember the names of that expanded on the Dracula setting, including the idea that there were several types of vampires (including those that fed on youth and emotions rather than blood) and that Dracula’s inability to see his reflection was tied more to his vanity than to his being a vampire.

    And while I’ve never been a big fan of zombies, I really liked the Black Lantern zombies and the zombie comedy films “Fido” and “Shaun of the Dead”.

  3. RAM_evilspaceknight
    August 31, 2014 at 4:42 pm — Reply

    Monster Squad (when the wolfman attacks)

    Sean: Kick him in the nards! Kick him in the nards!
    Horace: He doesn’t have nards!
    Sean: Do it, do it!
    Horace: (after kicking) Wolfman’s got nards!

    This was the pinnacle of highbrow humour when I was 10.

    • AmFan15
      September 2, 2014 at 12:56 am — Reply

      The Wolf Man really had some of the greatest scenes in that movie. I loved how they proved, beyond a shadow of a doubt, that a werewolf can ONLY be killed by a silver bullet. They pushed him out a window, and blew him to bits with dynamite…only to have the pieces REFORM THEMSELVES, so he could go on the attack again!

      That was a truly bad-ass modern use of classic monster lore.

  4. b003
    September 1, 2014 at 10:21 pm — Reply

    Hmm.. maybe Groovie Ghoulies. I do have a soft spot for a lot of the Horror Hosts, Sir Graves Ghastley and the The Ghoul.

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