Hexed #1 Review

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Hexed is a new comic from Boom! Studios about a woman named Lucifer who steals magical items.  Why does she steal them?  And just why is her name Lucifer?  Read the following review for possible answers!

Hexed_1_coverHEXED #1
Writer: Michael Alan Nelson
Artist: Dan Mora
Letterer: Ed Dukeshire
Colorist: Gabriel Cassata
Editor: Eric Harburn
Publisher: Boom! Studios
Cover Price: $3.99

Previously in Hexed: New series. New number one!

 

 

IN THE MIDDLE OF MADNESS

Hexed #1 has some great ideas and story but I found myself asking a few too many questions.  That’s perfectly fine for a first issue, but Hexed could have used a bit more explanation.  Lucifer is a young woman who is able to use magic to steal magical items for her mentor Val Brisendine.  During the theft of a painting’s frame, she traps a dying guard inside in order to save his life.  When she brings the guard out of the painting she unwillingly frees an evil man named Yves.  This leads to someone else’s life put in danger and Lucifer must enter the Shade, a place where the entry fee is your life

If that sounds cool, believe me, it is.  The issue moves at a frantic pace and introduces so many great ideas in such a short period that it’s almost overwhelming.  Lucifer’s personality is cocky and headstrong but she’s likeable in her actions to save innocent lives, especially considering their condition is her fault.  The opening is fun and Lucifer’s narration is a great introduction to the character.  It’s clear magic is a major factor in this world, with artifacts and rituals sprinkled throughout.  My biggest problem is the lack of explanation.  Why is she called Lucifer?  Is she the Lucifer we know, or is it a nickname?  How is she able to do the things she can and exactly why is she doing them?  There is an attempt to explain a bit, in a rather blatant way, but it’s not sufficient.  It’s always good to have some mystery to a story in order to bring readers back but there is so much here that I found myself a bit too confused.  This led to me asking so many questions that I was distracted from the cool story.  Michael Alan Nelson has lots of great ideas but I hope he gives more backstory in future issues.

PRETTY WOMEN, PRETTY COLORS

Dan Mora’s illustration and Gabriel Cassata’s colors are pretty damn amazing.  In fact, they’re downright pretty.  The whole issue is vibrant in not just color but energy as well.  Mora matches the pace of the story and the majority of panels are packed with art.  The highlight is when Lucifer enters the painting as lines become softer and the color blurred in order match the painting’s tones.  It’s a nice, subtle touch and proves how an artist and colorist who work well together can elevate a book.  Mora is able to draw attractive women without giving them unrealistic proportions and giant breasts.  He sometimes falls into the trap of giving them the same face but it’s never hard to distinguish characters.  Even his drawings of horrific things, particularly Harlot, have an appealing look.  Needless to say, I’m a fan.

BOTTOM LINE: WITH MORE BACKSTORY, IT COULD BE GREAT

Hexed #1 is a good start to a new series and does a nice job of hooking readers.  Its biggest problem is the lack of clarity in the actions and motives of characters.  While a little mystery is great, there’s too much, leading to some distraction.  With a little more backstory Hexed could be a really great book.  The art and coloring are incredible, vibrant and a joy the whole way through.  I had a blast reading it and have faith that this one’s going to become a real winner.

Hexed is a new comic from Boom! Studios about a woman named Lucifer who steals magical items.  Why does she steal them?  And just why is her name Lucifer?  Read the following review for possible answers! HEXED #1 Writer: Michael Alan Nelson Artist: Dan Mora Letterer: Ed Dukeshire Colorist: Gabriel Cassata Editor: Eric Harburn Publisher: Boom! Studios Cover Price: $3.99 Previously in Hexed: New series. New number one!     IN THE MIDDLE OF MADNESS Hexed #1 has some great ideas and story but I found myself asking a few too many questions.  That’s perfectly fine for a first issue, but Hexed could have used a bit more explanation.  Lucifer is a young woman who is able to use magic to steal magical items for her mentor Val Brisendine.  During the theft of a painting’s frame, she traps a dying guard inside in order to save his life.  When she brings the guard out of the painting she unwillingly frees an evil man named Yves.  This leads to someone else’s life put in danger and Lucifer must enter the Shade, a place where the entry fee is your life If that sounds cool, believe me, it is.  The issue moves at a frantic pace and introduces so many great ideas in such a short period that it’s almost overwhelming.  Lucifer’s personality is cocky and headstrong but she’s likeable in her actions to save innocent lives, especially considering their condition is her fault.  The opening is fun and Lucifer’s narration is a great introduction to the character.  It’s clear magic is a major factor in this world, with artifacts and rituals sprinkled throughout.  My biggest problem is the lack of explanation.  Why is she called Lucifer?  Is she the Lucifer we know, or is it a nickname?  How is she able to do the things she can and exactly why is she doing them?  There is an attempt to explain a bit, in a rather blatant way, but it’s not sufficient.  It’s always good to have some mystery to a story in order to bring readers back but there is so much here that I found myself a bit too confused.  This led to me asking so many questions that I was distracted from the cool story.  Michael Alan Nelson has lots of great ideas but I hope he gives more backstory in future issues. PRETTY WOMEN, PRETTY COLORS Dan Mora’s illustration and Gabriel Cassata’s colors are pretty damn amazing.  In fact, they’re downright pretty.  The whole issue is vibrant in not just color but energy as well.  Mora matches the pace of the story and the majority of panels are packed with art.  The highlight is when Lucifer enters the painting as lines become softer and the color blurred in order match the painting’s tones.  It’s a nice, subtle touch and proves how an artist and colorist who work well together can elevate a book.  Mora is able to draw attractive women without giving them unrealistic proportions and giant breasts. …

Writing

Art

Coloring



Even with a few too many mysteries, Hexed #1 is a good start to a new series with killer art and coloring.

User Rating: 4.75 ( 1 votes)

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