Lords of the Feywild

In this episode of Critical Hit, A Major Spoilers Dungeons and Dragons Podcast: We haven’t talked about leveling up in a while, so Stephen, Rodrigo, and Matthew chat about Level 13 and a few other questions that get asked a lot.

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The Author

Stephen Schleicher

Stephen Schleicher

Stephen Schleicher began his career writing for the Digital Media Online community of sites, including Digital Producer and Creative Mac covering all aspects of the digital content creation industry. He then moved on to consumer technology, and began the Coolness Roundup podcast. A writing fool, Stephen has freelanced for Sci-Fi Channel's Technology Blog, and Gizmodo. Still longing for the good ol' days, Stephen launched Major Spoilers in July 2006, because he is a glutton for punishment.

You can follow him on Twitter @MajorSpoilers and tell him your darkest secrets...

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10 Comments

  1. Wandering Monk
    September 1, 2013 at 10:08 pm — Reply

    I hope we get to see the Torquletones reach the 21-30 epic levels someday. It would be interesting to see how each character would handle their own approach to godliness.

  2. September 1, 2013 at 10:10 pm — Reply

    I just thought Steven might like to know that he can wield his longsword in one hand, and his wand in the other. He doesn’t have to constantly put one away and switch out. And, when combat starts and Orem is caught without a weapon, he can spend a Minor Action and draw both at once. Even in the Character builder, you can equip the longsword in the main hand, and wand in the off hand. Just saying…

    Oh, I also think that there is a feat that allows you to use two implements on the same spell, using both modifiers to enhance the accuracy, but only one for damage. You might look into that.

    Anyways, keep up the good work, and keep on crittin’!

    • Adam
      September 12, 2013 at 4:56 pm — Reply

      The feat is dual implement spellcaster.
      Its good but personally I prefer War Wizardry as a feat since it lets you blast away with less fear of hurting your allies.

    • Paul
      September 14, 2013 at 5:51 am — Reply

      This is one of my pet hates for D&D. Ever tried to wield a longsword single-handed? You can do it for 1 or 2 desperation techniques, but you don’t want to be doing it all day.
      (for qualification – I have studied longsword martial arts in the 15th century Liectenauer style for the last 10 years and taught for 6)

  3. Thorfinn
    September 3, 2013 at 12:14 am — Reply

    Congratulations on getting Torq added to the Oxford dictionary. For some reason they have seemed to misspell it, and use it as a verb. It appears to mean to duck in a suggestive manor.

    • XantharTheFlame
      October 9, 2013 at 1:39 pm — Reply

      Is a “suggestive manor” a really lewd looking big house? :-)

  4. September 12, 2013 at 4:59 pm — Reply

    In regards to the Fire Wizard topic, there is an 4e Essentials Mage specialization called Pyromancer that gains a class feat that ignores all fire resistance on an enemy so you CAN be a straight up fire wizard if you want to.

    Granted, that’s only for fire. But it’s not exactly hard to re-flavor the Pyromancer to any one kind of damage. Just Find & Replace Fire with Cold, Lightning, etc.

    The Essentials Mage is actually probably my favorite addition to the game. It plays pretty much exactly like the original wizard, but adds a bunch of specialization options like Necromancer, Pyromancer, Shadow Wizard, and the ability to follow the path of any of the schools of magic (Evocation, Conjuration, Illusion, etc). They also added Utility powers along with Dailies and Encounters to the Spellbook.

    • XantharTheFlame
      October 9, 2013 at 1:54 pm — Reply

      So why would anyone choose to be a generalist wizard? At least in previous editions they hampered the specialist wizards by making them unable to use spells from the magic school of opposition.

      • October 9, 2013 at 5:31 pm — Reply

        I imagine the draw to a generalist wizard would be that they get class bonuses to their implements that can be applied to a number of if not all schools of magic. Where as the specialists from the Mage class only get bonuses to their specific schools (Evocation specialists can re-roll 1 damage die on any spell with the evocation keyword, etc). Where as the generalist wizard could use Wand of Accuracy on any spell really. So if you want to dabble in all the schools, the implement bonuses seem to be better.

        It’s not quite as harsh as locking you out of a school of magic, but that’s 4th edition in a nutshell really. No minuses to ability scores, no alignment restrictions on classes, etc.

  5. Mister Jeff
    October 15, 2014 at 10:06 pm — Reply

    Nope, I started at #1 and still progressing through all of the back issues. (Altho, seeing some of the twitter comments has been wearing down my resolve. )

    Everyone should do the full-content challenge! :)

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