MAJOR SPOILERS POLL OF THE WEEK: Print is Dead Edition

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This week, Major Spoilerite Silvergray (if that is his real name) once again ponders the on-going battle between Marvel and DC, but couches it in a way we haven’t thought of before.  In each universe there is a major newspaper that circulates the news, both good and bad regarding superheroes.  Each of those newspapers is run by an Editor in Chief, but who sells the more papers, Perry White or J. Jonah Jameson?

Perry White

Perry White is a fictional character who appears in the Superman comics. White is the Editor-in-Chief of the Metropolis newspaper the Daily Planet.

White maintains very high ethical and journalistic standards. He is an archetypal image of the tough, irascible but fairminded boss. White’s most well known catchphrases are “Great Caesar’s ghost!” and “Don’t call me chief!”

According to post-Crisis comic-book continuity, White was an award-winning journalist who served a term as Mayor of Metropolis. He worked as an assistant editor on the Metropolis Daily Star under George Taylor before becoming editor of the Planet.

J. Jonah Jameson

John Jonah Jameson, Jr. is a supporting character (and sometimes an antagonist) of Spider-Man in the Marvel Comics Universe.

Jameson is usually the publisher or editor-in-chief of the Daily Bugle, a fictional New York newspaper and now serves as the mayor of New York City. Recognizable by his mustache, flattop haircut, and ever-present cigar, he carries out a smear campaign against Spider-Man that has, at least temporarily, turned much of the gullible city against the hero. He employs photojournalist Peter Parker, who, unbeknownst to Jameson, is Spider-Man’s alter ego.

Portrayals of Jameson have varied throughout the years. Sometimes he is shown as a foolishly stubborn and pompous skinflint who micromanages his employees and resents Spider-Man out of jealousy. Other writers have portrayed him more humanly, as a humorously obnoxious yet caring boss who nevertheless has shown great bravery and integrity in the face of the assorted villains with which the Bugle comes into contact, and whose campaign against Spider-Man comes more from fear of youngsters following his example. In either case, he has remained an important part of the Spider-Man mythos.

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Who sells more papers?

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