Bluewater Productions has announced it will turn the spotlight on Ayn Rand in an upcoming Female Force bio comic.  The issue, which is scheduled to arrive in May takes a look at the Atlas Shrugged author who kicked of the Objectivism movement.

“When the American economy went into a nose dive recently what did we all turn to? Did we dig out battered old Econ 101 text books? Did we turn to the writings of some aged Ivy League professor? NO! Instead we dusted off or repurchased ‘The Fountainhead’ and ‘Atlas Shrugged’ those great classic American novels by Russian immigrant Ayn Rand which deal so brilliantly with the fundamentals of a free and prosperous society of responsible individuals,” said author John Blundell.

 

Blundell is the author behind the Margaret Thatcher bio comic, also from Bluewater Productions.  The issue will feature art by Todd Tenant, and has a $3.99 cover price.

via Bluewater Productions

The Author

Stephen Schleicher

Stephen Schleicher

Stephen Schleicher began his career writing for the Digital Media Online community of sites, including Digital Producer and Creative Mac covering all aspects of the digital content creation industry. He then moved on to consumer technology, and began the Coolness Roundup podcast. A writing fool, Stephen has freelanced for Sci-Fi Channel's Technology Blog, and Gizmodo. Still longing for the good ol' days, Stephen launched Major Spoilers in July 2006, because he is a glutton for punishment.

You can follow him on Twitter @MajorSpoilers and tell him your darkest secrets...

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5 Comments

  1. Andrew H.
    March 29, 2011 at 1:44 pm — Reply
    • March 29, 2011 at 5:46 pm — Reply

      Rand did stuff that was way more hypocritical than that; and I say this as someone who likes her philosophy.

      • ykw
        March 30, 2011 at 5:08 pm — Reply

        There’s nothing hypocritical about opposing a law, policy or project while at the same time acknowledging and adjusting to its existence. I can oppose whatever the current tax structure is at a given moment while also paying that level of tax without being a hypocrite. I can oppose the drug laws yet not use illegal substances without being a hypocrite. I can oppose building unnecessary new roads or expanding existing ones yet still use them once they’re built without being a hypocrite.

        What would make me a hypocrite would be to demand that everyone else do something while I refuse to do so. If I told people they needed to “buy American” while I conspicuously consumed non-American goods, I would be a hypocrite. If I told people they needed to reduce their carbon footprint while conspicuously expanding my own, I would be a hypocrite. But telling people a law needs to be changed, then continuing to acknowledge it’s still the law? Absolutely not.

        On the topic at hand: I’m hoping this will be less difficult to slog through than the ANTHEM GN. It’s beautiful to look at — widescreen Staton-pencilled art tends to be so — but there’s nothing a write can do to fix the awful narrative structure (without creating a work that really isn’t ANTHEM any longer, anyway; thankfully, Rand would subsequently begin to let her Hugo flag fly on her more famous works, making them enjoyable if sometimes challenging and extremely time-consuming reads). I’ll have my copy of THE PASSION OF AYN RAND out, though, to pick at this book’s doubtlessly many nits.

        • March 30, 2011 at 5:59 pm — Reply

          Good point. ‘Hypocritical’ was probably too strong; I probably should have gone with ‘paradoxical.’

    • Tom
      May 16, 2011 at 12:41 am — Reply

      She had every right! It is because she was opposed to such government programs that she had a right to them – to some return on her own investment.

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