Can the new story arc possibly meet ongoing reader’s expectations? The first 4-issue storyline, “The Duck Knight Returns” was an unqualified success. The title has proven to be rife with cleverness and laugh-out-loud moments. Read on to find out if lightning can indeed strike twice.

Written by Ian Brill
Drawn by James Silvani
Colored by Andrew Dalhouse
Letters by Deron Bennett
Cover(s) by: Sabrina Alberghetti & James Silvani
Published by BOOM! Studios

Darkwing Duck Is BACK!

Issue 5 makes for a good starting point for anyone who hasn’t already embraced the triumphant return of the Masked Mallard, Darkwing Duck. After being out of commission for a while, our hero is back on the scene and has returned to his former glory days of crime fighting and public adoration. As things are looking up for Darkwing Duck, his longtime nemesis Negaduck has other plans for St. Canard’s favorite vigilante. Negaduck wants what most bad guys in traditional comics want: to take Darkwing Duck down in a very public arena so that his defeat isn’t just a physical takedown, but something even more damaging. We are about to see Darkwing Duck’s approval rating take an unprecedented nosedive. It would appear that we’re about to see the hunter become the hunted.

Not Just Another Crisis

As the title eludes, “Crisis on Infinite Darkwings,” this story doesn’t simply take place on one world. Negaduck has teamed up with another baddie, Magica de Spell. Together, they’re intent on channeling their negative energies on Darkwing Duck on every plane of existence.
While “Crisis on Infinite Darkwings” lacks some of the charisma, charm and wit of the first story arc, readers will still find plenty of entertainment. Admittedly, this is only the first issue of a brand new storyline, so things could very well ramp up quickly with next month’s release. Writer Ian Brill and artist James Silvani are the same creative team that brought us “Duck Knight” so I continue to be enthusiastically optimistic about this title. Nobody can accuse these boys of decompression. An awful lot of storytelling occurs within this issue; Even the appearance of a long lost love interest for our hero.

Does Darkwing Duck Fit The Bill?

Brill has more than proven his writing prowess with the first 4 issues of Darkwing Duck. This issue may not have all the powerfully creative elements of this arcs predecessor, but it remains a thoroughly enjoyable read and a jewel in the crown of BOOM! Studios. This issue earns 3.5 stars out of 5.

Rating: ★★★½☆

The Author

Mike McLarty

Mike McLarty

A San Diego native, Mike has comics in his blood and has attended the San Diego Comic Con every year since 1982. His comic interests are as varied as his crimes against humanity, but he tends to lean heavily towards things rooted in dystopian themes. His favorite comic series is Warren Ellis’ and Darick Robertson’s Transmetropolitan. Spider Jerusalem is the best character ever devised. Mike realizes those statements will alienate a good portion of his potential audience, but those are the facts. You are unlikely to find a single collector with a better Transmetropolitan art portfolio than the one he has in his possession. He is an Assistant Editor for the upcoming Transmetropolitan Charity Book.

He also occasionally freelances for various other comics websites, which he promotes through his homepage (, Twitter and other inherently intrusive forms of social media. Mike firmly believes that the best writers come from the UK. This could be because he’s of Irish descent; not so much based on physical geography as the fact that the Irish like to drink heavily.

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  1. Sara
    October 29, 2010 at 6:01 am — Reply

    Actually, if you read around the web “Duck Knight” was actually conceived/plotted by then editor Aaron Sparrow. Series creator Tad Stones has said as much on his Facebook page and at conventions. So a lot of the credit should go to him. “Crisis” is said to be Ian Brill’s first time working on his story instead of someone else’s, which might explain how it’s not quite as witty or well constructed as the first arc.

  2. October 29, 2010 at 9:03 am — Reply

    That’s VERY interesting! There is definitely a difference between story arcs. So much so that I honestly thought they had switched writers. I guess they did.

    Off to scour the interwebs for that hot tip.

    Much appreciated!

  3. Sara
    November 12, 2010 at 2:37 am — Reply

    I guess you could contact Aaron Sparrow through his twitter or facebook page; he’s pretty active on both and seems to respond to fans.

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