truth, red, white, and black

This week on the show: The first Captain America, Locke & Key, DC gets a review, and the Hulk returns to Television.

[podcast]http://traffic.libsyn.com/majorspoilers/majorspoilers245.mp3[/podcast]

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Show Notes after the Jump!

NEWS
Hulk returns to television
LINKAGE

REVIEWS
Stephen
Locke & Key: Keys to the Kingdom #2
Writer: Joe Hill
Art: Gabriel Rodriguez
On a bitter winter day, Kinsey Locke encounters a madwoman who just might be able to unlock the darkest secrets of Keyhouse. But forcing the truth out of her won’t be easy, and besides… Dodge has no intention of ever giving Erin Voss a chance to tell what she knows.

Rating: ★★★★★

Matthew
Knight and Squire #1
Written by PAUL CORNELL; Art by JIMMY BROXTON; Cover by YANICK PAQUETTE; 1:10 Variant cover by BILLY TUCCI
Just as Gotham City has Batman and Robin, London has Knight and Squire – the British heroes and frequent allies of The Dark Knight! In a secret bar within the city where peace is kept magically, heroes and villains gather to enjoy a pint and talk about their day. But what happens when the magical barriers that disallow fighting are dropped and a building full of heroes and villains confront each other all at once? Knight and Squire have to keep the peace and save both friend and foe in this 6-issue miniseries from hot writer Paul Cornell (ACTION COMICS, Captain Britain and MI:13) and up-and-coming artist Jimmy Broxton (THE UNWRITTEN).

Rating: ★★★★½

MAJOR SPOILERS POLL OF THE WEEK
There have been some really weird crossover comics, until I wandered down the toy aisle and saw the Superman vs. He-Man action figure two pack, I completely forgot that the two actually met in a DC crossover event in 1982.  Back then, Superman was able to bring He-Man down with a well placed punch, but both characters have gone through an evolution since then.  So…

VOTE

MAJOR SPOILERS DISCUSSION: Truth: Red, White, and Black
Set in the Marvel Universe, the series takes the Tuskegee Experiments as inspiration for a tale that re-examines the history of the super-serum that created Captain America. Beginning in 1942, the series follows a regiment of black soldiers who are forced to act as test subjects in a program attempting to re-create the lost formula earlier used to turn Steve Rogers to Captain America. The experiments lead to mutation and death, until only one remains – Isaiah Bradley.

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Music from this episode comes from Armin Brewer (intro) and James Kennison (closing) from the Nobody’s Listening Podcast. A big thanks to both of these guys for creating kick-ass music for the show!

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The Author

Robot Overlord

Robot Overlord

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5 Comments

  1. October 20, 2010 at 11:27 am — Reply

    This podcast contains a secret hidden reference (actually two of them) for one of our regular listeners.

    Listen closely, and you’ll know who you are.

    • Ricco
      October 20, 2010 at 7:31 pm — Reply

      Hermit, who said “as long as it’s not ABC Family” regarding the upcomming Hulk show. Never ask a guy with mild OCD to look for something ;-)

      I’m conflicted with this trade the history sounds good to me as a non-black but, I tried telling my black coworkers that the first Captain American was black and got a “really, what’s this foolishness!? everyone know it’s this white guy Steve something”. Those are the same that dislike the idea of a black Nick Fury and hated the black Kingpin in Daredevil played by Michael Clarke Duncan. Do we have any black readers in Majorspoilers to comment on the trade?

  2. October 20, 2010 at 12:01 pm — Reply

    Great show, and though I missed you all having the whole crew together, since Rodrigo really phoned this episode in, it all was gravy.

    Thanks Matthew, now I will be racking my brain to uncover the “Peterson Code”.

  3. October 22, 2010 at 5:52 pm — Reply

    There were numerous references to the Tuskegee Airmen and to the the Tuskegee Syphilis Study by both Matthew and Stephen in this podcast. The references sometimes made it seem as if they are one and the same. The plot of Truth perhaps helps confuse the issue with it’s military/experimentation themes, but they are two distinct historical items.

    The Tuskegee Airmen were two Groups of black pilots, the 332nd Fighter Group, and the 477th Bombardment Group of the Army Air Corps. Segregated and facing much racism, the Airmen served during WWII with much distinction, flying over 15,000 sorties. They were not the subject of any scientific studies or experiments.

    The Tuskegee Syphilis Studies were conducted from 1932 up to as late as 1972. The tests were conducted on 399 black sharecroppers by the Public Health Service in conjunction with the Tuskegee Institute to study the natural progression of untreated syphilis. The subjects were not informed of their infections, and were not cured even though the cure was available at the time.

    I just wanted to clarify, because the confusion and melding of these two separate historical items seems to be common, I assume because of their names and the nature of the racial elements of both stories. I’ve heard the mistake made in many places outside of the MS Podcast, but I know the guys like to be accurate in their presentation of information. I also know they won’t mind me highlighting the distinction between the two items as it relates to the discussion.

    • October 22, 2010 at 8:33 pm — Reply

      I just wanted to clarify, because the confusion and melding of these two separate historical items seems to be common, I assume because of their names and the nature of the racial elements of both stories. I’ve heard the mistake made in many places outside of the MS Podcast, but I know the guys like to be accurate in their presentation of information. I also know they won’t mind me highlighting the distinction between the two items as it relates to the discussion.

      Thanks for the historical accuracy, sir. The misstatements seem to be mine, and Stephen adopted my incorrect terminology as the discussion went on…

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