Scrooge McDuck is challenged to a race around the world by rival John D. Rockerduck. The challenge for Scrooge is not to make it in 80 days or less, but to spend 80 bucks or less. Can the frugal Scrooge find a way to complete the journey on very tight budget?

Uncle Scrooge – Around the World in 80 Bucks
Writer: Staff Di If
Artists: Fransesc Bargada Studio
Letterer: Jose Macasocol Jr.
Published by Boom Kids

Scrooge is known for his penny pinching, tight wallet and grumpy attitude. He only seems to lighten up when the chance to make a buck or two comes along. In this story Scrooge is challenged to a race around the world by a business rival. However, Scrooge has to do the whole trip with less than 80 bucks in little used money purse.
The story opens with Scrooge at the Duckburg Billionaires Club, reading the paper. His rival, John D Rockerduck is boasting about his latest vacation, travelling around the work in his luxurious yacht. He asks McDuck how he’ll be spending his vacation, to which Scrooge replies, that he’ll be at home making money from travelers like Rockerduck staying at his hotels, and buying gas at his gas stations. Rockerduck thinks that Scrooge is jealous and soon the challenge is issued. McDuck must travel around the world visiting famous landmarks and can spend no more then $80 for the whole trip. Scrooge is so confident that he even says he’ll bring along a partner and still not go over budget.

In comes Donald Duck, Scrooge’s nephew and in this adventure his Passpartout. Donald doesn’t believe it can be done but has no other vacation plans as he nephews have gone to a Woodchucks camp for the summer. Rockerduck is not going to sit idly by however and let McDuck have an easy time of it. He has arranged for a saboteur to prevent Scrooge from succeeding.

The story unfolds as Scrooge finds ways to spend as little as possible to get where he needs to go and in some cases actually earn a few bucks along the way. Rockerduck continually attempts to undermine Scrooge and Donald’s plans, sometimes successfully, but not in the way he would have hoped.

The art is very typically Disney style. The characters are drawn and colored in the same way they always have in both film and comic. It’s a wonderful throwback to a simple drawing style that puts more emphasis on the story then the images.

Bottom Line: Is It Right For Kids?

As a parent, this is the kind of book that I love to see. It has a fun and simple story that young kids will find easy to follow. The images are clean and colorful with just the right amount of detail when needed. Kids can even learn a few things along the way. This book is very right for kids. Young and old will enjoy this story. 4 out of 5 Stars.

Rating: ★★★★☆

The Author

Tore

Tore

Tore’s first memory of comics are the Donald Ducks that he would get on his family trips to Norway back in the 70s. They were in Norwegian, but that in itself wasn’t a big problem. It was just fun to look at the pictures and read what he could. Some of those comics are still on the shelf and get read occasionally when a break from Super Heroes and the latest crisis is needed. High School, college, a career in the IT field and family put comics on the back burner until 2005 when needing an escape from the grief of a personal loss, comics re-entered his life in the form of Batman: Hush. This story rekindled his interest in Comics. Soon a pull list exceeding 25 monthly titles was presented to the local Comic shop, statues and action figures started to line the shelves and Comic-Con was on the yearly holiday schedule. Being an iPad owner, digital comics have become a staple on his device and he’s looking forward to seeing more comics and publishers make their books available this way.
However, being a father he wanted to introduce his young daughter to his hobby but too many comics were too violent or had story lines way too advanced for a 5 year old girl. So began the search for comics that were right for kids. And so was born Is It Right For Kids, a website with reviews of popular entertainment for parents with kids. That includes TV and Movies as well as comics. Have a daughter makes it easier to review things. It’s not many a parents that can claim his 5 year old loves to watch Darkwing Duck and can name the 7 founding members of the JLA.

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