The Sandman Podcast

In this issue: Kull, Black Cat, and Klingon top the news, while comic book database software and Marvel titles are talked up in this week’s reviews. The Major Spoilers Crew heft the might tome of Absolute Sandman Volume 1 and tell you all about it.

[podcast]http://media.libsyn.com/media/majorspoilers/majorspoilers_154.mp3[/podcast]

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Show Notes after the Jump!

NEWS
New Kull movie on the way
Linkage
Smallville Trailer Shows of the JSA
Linkage
Child Abuse or Most Awesome Dad Ever?
Linkage
NOTE: Stephen mentions the unethical experiments involving babies and isolation chambers. It isn’t human babies, but rather baby monkeys (see Harry Harlow)

Anne Hathaway as Black Cat
Linkage
Best of 2009
Linkage

REVIEWS
Rodrigo
THE MARVELOUS LAND OF OZ #1 (of 8)
Written by ERIC SHANOWER
Pencils & Cover by SKOTTIE YOUNG

The epic continues! Fresh off their landmark run on THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF OZ, superstars ERIC SHANOWER (Age of Bronze) and SKOTTIE YOUNG (X-MEN) return with L. Frank Baum’s MARVELOUS LAND OF OZ. Join new characters Tip and Jack Pumpkinhead as they’re whisked to Oz, and meet foes and friends! You’ve NEVER seen L. Frank Baum’s masterpiece like this before…

Stephen
ComicBase 14.1
ComicBase put the world’s largest database of comics right on your desktop, and makes it easier than ever to manage your collection with a clean, streamlined interface. Instantly look information on over 440,000 comics ranging from pre-Golden Age classics to independent and small press publishers—foreign comics too! With built-in information on virtually every comic published in the English language since 1878, along with current pricing from Comics Buyer’s Guide

Matthew
DARK AVENGERS #11
Written by BRIAN MICHAEL BENDIS
Pencils & Cover by MIKE DEODATO

The explosive smash hit series from Brian Bendis and Mike Deodato continues!! The Dark Avengers are pitted against a foe they cannot defeat: A man with the power over every molecule in the world! Norman can’t talk his way out of this one as the world gets turned upside down and no joke…someone dies. For reelz!!

MAJOR SPOILERS POLL OF THE WEEK
There are few movies that have created throngs of movie nerds, and unfortunately many of those nerds some of them are quite annoying.  Which brings us to the Major Spoilers Poll of the Week!
Star Trek
Star Wars
Harry Potter
Twilight

Get over to the Major Spoilers Website and vote.
VOTE

MAJOR SPOILERS DISCUSSION: Absolute Sandman Volume 1
THE ABSOLUTE SANDMAN VOL. 1 collects issues #1-20 of THE SANDMAN and features completely new coloring, approved by the author on the first 18 issues, as well as a host of never-before-seen extra material including the complete original Sandman proposal, a gallery of character designs from Gaiman and the artists who originated the look of the Sandman, and the original script for the World Fantasy Award-winning THE SANDMAN #19, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” together with reproductions of the issue’s original pencils by Charles Vess.

Contact us at podcast@majorspoilers.com

Music from this episode comes from Armin Brewer (intro) and James Kennison (closing) from the Nobody’s Listening Podcast. A big thanks to both of these guys for creating kick-ass music for the show!

A big Thank You goes out to everyone who downloads, subscribes, listens, and supports this show. We really appreciate you taking the time to listen to our ramblings each week. Tell your friends about the podcast, get them to subscribe and, be sure to visit the Major Spoilers site and forums.

The Author

Robot Overlord

Robot Overlord

Warning: Pregnant women, the elderly, and children under 10 should avoid prolonged exposure to the Robot Overlord. Robot Overlord may suddenly accelerate to dangerous speeds. The Robot Overlord contains a liquid core, which if exposed due to rupture, should not be touched, inhaled, or looked at. If Robot Overlord begins to smoke, get away immediately. Seek shelter and cover head. Do not taunt the Robot Overlord.

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14 Comments

  1. lifeisaglitch
    November 25, 2009 at 7:08 am — Reply

    Normally I would just mail you guys but I’ve tried that and apparently it doesn’t work….so….

    – Whats the name of the “official” majorspoilers font and where can I find it?

    (Also what Robot does Matthew insist on parodying on Critical Hit and sometimes during this episode?)

    • November 25, 2009 at 8:00 am — Reply

      the podcast@majorspoilers.com does work, and as I look back through the mail pile, I don’t see anything…

      While there is no “official” Major Spoilers font, I am mighty partial to the letter stylings of J. Scott Campbell for our logos and graphics…

      Who knows what Matthew is attempting to do.. the man is an enigma, wrapped in a burrito, with a heaping of cheese fries on top.

      • lifeisaglitch
        November 25, 2009 at 8:41 am — Reply

        Not seeing anything would normally imply that it doesn’t work 100%…
        Thanks for the font info though, just too bad it isn’t free.
        Keep up the good work and do get to reviewing a Tom Strong paperback one of these days ;)

      • November 25, 2009 at 1:27 pm — Reply

        Great! Now I desperately want a burrito with cheese fries!

        :)

    • November 25, 2009 at 8:19 pm — Reply

      (Also what Robot does Matthew insist on parodying on Critical Hit and sometimes during this episode?)

      It’s a long story, and not nearly as interesting as one might think… I’ll tell it, if ya want, but you’ll be bored.

  2. November 25, 2009 at 1:17 pm — Reply

    Okay. So I’ve actually done research on this, and can cite the sources if pressed.

    The earliest that Shakespeare could have written Romeo and Juliet was in 1591. While the folio was published in 1625, there’s a reference in the story that places it in 1591.

    The first recorded printing of Romeo and Juliet, however, was written as a commentary on papal intervention in government. Tommaso Guardati (writing under the name of Masuccio Salernitano) wrote it, and it was published in 1475 as the 33rd story in a collection of more than 50 pieces. It was banned and references to it disappeared until Luigi Da Porto published Historia Novellamente Ritrovata di Due Nobili Amanti in 1530.

    Matteo Bandello then turned the work into a poem and published it as Giuletta e Romeo in 1554. In 1562, Pierre Boaistuau translated the poem into French and the Capuleti and Montecchi families became the Capulets and the Montagues.

    This French work was then translated into English by Arthur Brooke in 1562 as The Tragicall Historye of Romeus and Juliet. This was then turned from poetry to prose by William Painter, and published in his book Palace of Pleasure in 1575.

    It is William Painter’s story that is credited as Shakespeare’s inspiration for his play.

    What I love about this progression is that, while the movement from remake to remake is sped up by technology (the invention of the printing press), no one knows any of those other names. Why? Because only Shakespeare was able to take that same story, make it more accessible and put it in a format enough key people could see and enjoy it.

    • November 25, 2009 at 2:39 pm — Reply

      nerd.
      :D

      • December 14, 2009 at 11:17 am — Reply

        Yes.

        Definitely.

        But I have had sex. At least, that’s what my wife tells me.

  3. November 25, 2009 at 1:21 pm — Reply

    Oh, and I also love how people talk about the copies of Shakespeare’s R&J (it’s been made into everything from Anime to Opera), with the assumption of Shakespeare’s version being the original.

    I’m not saying that to be the snarky “you don’t know as much about it as I do,” but to say, if you are citing Shakespeare as a the singular source of all things–saying his is the original and, therefore, the standard, you need to rethink. If you are saying that his work was the BEST version for whatever reason, then that’s something else.

    • November 25, 2009 at 8:18 pm — Reply

      I’m not saying that to be the snarky “you don’t know as much about it as I do,” but to say, if you are citing Shakespeare as a the singular source of all things–saying his is the original and, therefore, the standard, you need to rethink. If you are saying that his work was the BEST version for whatever reason, then that’s something else.

      Certainly not best, but it tends to be the source that most people would recognize for that particular story. Your point here actually supports MY point that adaptations, revamps, retcons and outright stealing are nothing new. :)

  4. Aerspyder
    November 30, 2009 at 10:13 am — Reply

    During the opening, Matthew mentioned “Crap…On…Yellowjacket” but I didn’t hear it metioned in the podcast proper. Did I miss something?

    • November 30, 2009 at 12:43 pm — Reply

      No, you actually caught it. Matthew threw that in thinking he was going to review one book, but went with another.

      • November 30, 2009 at 10:40 pm — Reply

        During the opening, Matthew mentioned “Crap…On…Yellowjacket” but I didn’t hear it mentioned in the podcast proper. Did I miss something?

        I exit my office at 7:00 p.m. A quick commute, whatever supper there is, and making sure that I’ve read the TPB offering later, I formulate my opening structure (which is not specifically a script, per se.) Sometimes, things change in transit, and I don’t change up the open (which is generally pretty much a loose affiliation of millionaires and billionaires and babay things that accumulate in my head as we’re spitballing before the recording on Skype) for three reasons:

        1. It gives you, the Faithful Spoilerites, a chance to view the evolution of the creative process.
        2. The rhythm of a podcast open is a curious and delicate thing. Futz with it too much, and the whole system could collapse.
        3. I’m essentially a “Can you start my orange?” kinda guy, and the simplest decision is usually the one I choose.

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