Sad news for those who were getting into DC’s Minx line – a line primarily aimed at female readers.  The company has announced it will cease publication in January 2009.

Minx will cease publication beginning January ’09. Minx was an experimental imprint for DC Comics and we are extremely proud of the books we published and the stories we told during the past two years. We thank all of the writers and artists who lent their talents to our endeavor and especially thank readers who came along for the ride. DC Comics remains committed to publishing diverse material for diverse audiences as we continue to welcome new readers.


If DC is willing to slash a whole imprint, look for more titles to get the axe in the near future.

via Minx

The Author

Stephen Schleicher

Stephen Schleicher

Stephen Schleicher began his career writing for the Digital Media Online community of sites, including Digital Producer and Creative Mac covering all aspects of the digital content creation industry. He then moved on to consumer technology, and began the Coolness Roundup podcast. A writing fool, Stephen has freelanced for Sci-Fi Channel's Technology Blog, and Gizmodo. Still longing for the good ol' days, Stephen launched Major Spoilers in July 2006, because he is a glutton for punishment.

You can follow him on Twitter @MajorSpoilers and tell him your darkest secrets...

Previous post

Marvel Preview: Samurai: Legend #1

Next post

Archie Comics Sneak Peek of the Week


  1. September 25, 2008 at 10:34 pm — Reply

    It’s truly a sad, sad story when a great idea like a line of graphic novels aimed at the young teen girls market can’t get off of the ground. I really believed in the Minx line as soon as I read their first book “The Plain Janes” The book wasn’t aimed at a then 41 year old man, but I enjoyed it a lot and it was one of my favorite graphic novels of 2007. I also enjoyed “The Re-Gifters,” Clubbing,” “The New York 4,” and am currently enjoying “Janes in Love.” I have passed these books onto my niece Crystal and she has enjoyed everyone of them and now they are gone. I don’t blame DC they tried, but it appears in the long run that bookstores just weren’t interested.
    What a shame.

  2. Rodrigo
    September 26, 2008 at 2:35 pm — Reply

    I was not aware of the existence of ‘Minx’, so without any sort of authority I will blame this on poor marketing

    • hen
      June 14, 2011 at 7:20 pm — Reply

      Again like many I hadn’t even known of minx, or anything like it until I read Plain Janes, a truly amazing graphic novel that really made me think, hey, here is a book with pictures in it that is intelligent and appeals to girls – don”t get me wrong other stuff that is published does too, but nothing is as well tailor made to fit as the few titles I have read form Minx’s range.
      It was stupid to axe it, pure and simple, they should have put more into promoting it, getting it into school and local libraries, this would have taken a few years, many more than two or three! Some things aren’t noticed till they disappear.

  3. October 1, 2008 at 8:19 pm — Reply

    This is so so sad! Plain Janes was great, the 2nd Janes was great too. I tell all of my friends with daughters to get them both. Any book that has art as a tool for protest, art as a tool for healing, art as a tool for bonding, has something far more interesting than crime fighting or boy trouble, to say, and it deserves to be heard. One of the Minx titles “Waterbaby” I think, the main character has her leg bitten of by a shark, yes you saw that, bitten off by a shark! Don’t tell me that wasn’t going to be an amazing story

    I am a girl, way older than the demo they were aiming for, but a girl nonetheless who is into comics, and I hadn’t even heard of Minx until I met Cecile Castelluci, author of the Plain Janes, at ComicCon. I now feel guilty that I missed the Minx panel at SDCC, but there was too much shiny stuff on the dealer floor I got distracted.

    So sad.

You know you have something to say, say it in the comment section