Or – “If Somebody Doesn’t Believe In Me, I Can’t Believe In Them.”

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I’ve been all over the map in my responses to the various issues of the Loners, and with this issue, I’m starting to understand why… There’s much more than six issues worth of story in these characters, and the writer is desperately trying to shove in as much as possible, and give each of them their own moment in the sun. The problem I’m finding is that we’re not dealing with a TEAM, we’re dealing with a disparate group of individuals who don’t really have anything in common other than a varying level of commitment to NOT using their superpowers. Since, at heart, it’s basically a superhero comic, they’re all going to have varying levels of disappointment…

Lone1.jpgPreviously, on The Loners: Ricochet, Turbo, Lightspeed, Green Goblin IV and Darkhawk have come together as an unofficial support group for young adults with super-powers, but the addition of Mattie Franklin, the former Spider-Woman IV, the team reaches critical mass. Within hours of joining, Spider-Woman has talked Darkhawk and Ricochet back into action, to take down a cell of drug dealers who exploited her metahuman nature. Ricochet then took center stage, tracking the villain Nekra from that drug den to her latest hideout, where he finds many superhumans held prisoner to create more drugs, including former Generation X’er Hollow (formerly known as Penance.) Hollow quickly guts Lightspeed, but calms down at the sight of Phil Urich, the former Green Goblin. When the mind behind the drug ring arrives, Turbo makes some sort of weird Bushido pact that bugs me greatly. It’s as if, since Turbo is the team’s Asian, she thus hasto be in the Yakuza. This issue starts with Johnny Gallo (Ricochet) and Julie Power (Lightspeed) having lunch and discussing their teammates. Julie has (correctly) ascertained that Turbo and Darkhawk are “doing it,” and starts to remark that she’d do Turbo before stopping awkwardly… She quickly changes the subject to her upcoming audition, and claims not to do well under pressure.

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While Julie takes the first big step towards stardom, (and hints that she may be gay) we check in on Phil Urich, who has essentially adopted Hollow as a pet. As she sleeps on the couch of his tiny apartment, Phil cleans the dishes and tries to figure out why she kissed him last issue, and why the only word she’s said in the entire time she’s been with him is “Like.” I can’t remember or not whether we’re supposed to be guessing as to the identity of the woman inside the pink body or not… As Julie’s narration about secrets continues, he suddenly is gripped by a hallucination, making me remember that you have to be crazy to be a Green Goblin…

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Julie’s audition does not go well, as the only advice she gets is “Take some acting lessons.” Ricochet tries to remind her that this is the hottest director in town, thanks to his new movie that almost all green screen (Zack Snyder?) but Julie is interested. “He doesn’t make movies! He makes video games!” cries the Power Pack cutie. “He wouldn’t know acting if he had an Oscar stuck up his–” Thankfully for my childhood memories, she is interrupted by Mark Lowell, another director of some renown who agrees that “guys like HIM” are ruining the movie-making business…

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Is it just me, or does the art remind anyone else of Kyle Baker in that middle lower panel? Karl Moline’s work has been all over the place on this book, and while it’s good, there are some odd stylistic choices in the work that bug me. Having lied about their status as registered, Julie and Chris are immediately hired (Yeah, right) as stuntmen on Lowell’s new film. Without checking their ID, running their W-2’s or any sort of official hiring practices (either a bad sign, or sloppy writing) they get straight to work. Meanwhile, Mickey (Turbo) Musashi and Chris (Darkhawk) Powell finally get some time to talk about the tempestuous relationship. He maintains that he only had good intentions, and wonders if she’s not angry about him breaking the “no powers” rule, but rather the fact that he did it with Mattie. Mickey admits that it is…

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Julie’s not into WHAT? That’s the second veiled hint that Lightspeed is a lesbian, and I wonder where they’re going with this. Is she even of legal age yet? While DH and Turbo go to figure out how to keep their respective armors clear of various bodily fluids, we return to Marvel Studios, where Julie is dolled up as The Black Cat, and Johnny as Iron Fist. (What the hell movie are they making, anyway? Marvel Team-Up the motion picture.) Now, I’ve never made an entire film, but I’ve shot and edited on both film and video, and there are three problems with what happens next. The unlicensed and unbonded stuntmen (Problem #1) are on a set that’s ready almost immediately, even though he didn’t have any stuntmen hired, (Problem #2) seemingly without any preparation, blocking, or choreography (Problem #3.) Apparently, in Loners Hollywood, some schmuck inna hat just points a camera at you and POW, you start slapping each other around.

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Johnny quickly recovers, and kicks her off the edge of the building, but she catches herself easily with her powers. The director calls it a take (Problem #4) and we’re done. Y’know, I’ve shot 30 second commercials that took literally DAYS to prep and shoot, so this is just a farce to me. I’m immediately wondering what sort of skeevy half-@$$ed production Julie has hooked up with… Julie is thrilled when she’s told she’ll “be a star,” and flies off to call her family with the good news. Johnny is left behind, but gets a call on his cell from Mattie…

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Wait, what? Spider-Woman is looking into the death of (apparently) Johnny’s ex-Slinger partner, The Hornet? Where the hell is THIS plot point coming from? Every issue of Loner feels like we’re getting fired out of a cannon at a group of story points with the hopes that some will stick… Case in point? Julie’s discussion with an unseen Katie Power, in which she admits that she hasn’t told her parents about her job, and accuses her of acting like a dumb blonde to get attention. “You’re my older sister,” chides Katie, “Don’t you think it’s time you started acting THAT part again?” Julie starts to think about herself, and heads back to her trailer. We get a semi-cheesecakey shot (it’s not overly sexy, but there’s a slight fan service feeling to it) of Julie in her underwear when there’s a knock at the door. Turns out I was right, Mr. Lowell isn’t the wonderful kuh-niggit in shining armor he seems, as he informs Julie that it’s time for her turn on his casting couch. “You come in here, dressed like that, playing all INNOCENT, willing to do ‘ANYTHING’ to get into show biz. Well, I’ve got the power to make it happen for you,” he slimes, putting his paws all over her… Anybody care to guess which word he shouldn’t have used in that sentence?

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If you said “power,” go to the head of the class, and tell Howard Hesseman I want my money back. So, not only did this idiot hire an UNLICENSED metahuman, not only did her put her in a dangerous situation without any insurance paperwork or official employment, not only did he try to nail her, he did it all WHILE SHE WAS UNDERAGE! Even the plotholes have plotholes here… Oy. Julie once again ends up on top of a building, seemingly ready to jump to her death (the second time this questionable analogy has been used in the series) but changes her mind and heads to the scheduled Loners’ meeting instead. “I was ten when an alien gave me these powers,” she explains, “much too young to handle the burden, but I had the responsibility forced on me… And we just knew that it had to stay between us kids. It was our secret.” Julie explains that because of that early introduction to prevarication, she’s gotten very good at lying, and that she’s been lying to everyone, ever since she arrived in Los Angeles.

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“…can make matters even worse.” The team turns to see an angry Nekra, ready to attack. Given that there are six of them, four of whom have innate powers, I think she may have misread this situation. Darkhawk or Lightspeed alone should probably be able to take her out. Either way, I’m still of very mixed opinions about this title, enjoying bits and pieces of it, but finding many of the characters very whiny and overly expository.

Some of the plot points feel shoved in with a crowbar, and while I applaud Marvel for trying to once again deal with a hard issue, I’m not sure where the hints as to Julie’s orientation can go in the two remaining issues of the book. The story feels very scattershot, only hitting it’s mark a couple of times, with the entire “Boom! You’re a stuntman!” sequence coming across as almost INSULTING in it’s ignorance of reality. Phil’s subplot seems to have the most ‘legs,’ and it’s the one that hasn’t really gone anywhere. As much as I want to love the Loners, I’m finding myself more and more alienated each issue. That said, this issue was better than last, with an explanation (abrupt though it was) of the changes in Miss Power, and nothing that made my stereotype sensors go off like Turbo’s moment last time ’round. I remarked a couple of months ago that this series still has time to kick out the jams, but the jams remainly firmly ensconced, having their loud parties and smoking all night. Taking into account the problems I see with the issue, it’s worth 1.5 stars out of 5, with hopes that there’s a bang-up ending in store.

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The Author

Matthew Peterson

Matthew Peterson

Once upon a time, there was a young nerd from the Midwest, who loved Matter-Eater Lad and the McKenzie Brothers... If pop culture were a maze, Matthew would be the Minotaur at its center. Were it a mall, he'd be the Food Court. Were it a parking lot, he’d be the distant Cart Corral where the weird kids gather to smoke, but that’s not important right now... Matthew enjoys body surfing (so long as the bodies are fresh), writing in the third person, and dark-eyed women. Amongst his weaponry are such diverse elements as: Fear! Surprise! Ruthless efficiency! An almost fanatical devotion to pop culture!

And a nice red uniform.

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16 Comments

  1. July 9, 2007 at 4:55 pm — Reply

    This title is just going lower and lower, ain’t it? I’d have much rather had, say, a Julie-Power mini or a return of Phil Urich as a Goblin (Hobgoblin maybe?), with ‘Hollow’ as supporting cast.

  2. Brent F.
    July 9, 2007 at 6:20 pm — Reply

    I’d much rather read a mini with some interesting characters.

  3. Mark I.
    July 9, 2007 at 6:47 pm — Reply

    No BS there, Salieri. I called “hackjob” on this series a few reviews ago. Sloppy stuff that wouldn’t have passed muster back in the “Suffering Sappho” era. And don’t get me started on the “new” Lightspeed.

    Maybe I’m a little sentimental about Julie Power. Still, Louise Simonson’s “child” used to be written as essentially the brainiest kid of the Power clan, the kind who would get so into a book she’d read while doing dishes. Now she’s a borderline bimbo with lesbo overtones. That’s just sad. Yes, I know, this isn’t Wonder Woman or Storm we’re talking about here, but maybe creating a natural progression for how this well-established (if less than overwhelmingly popular) character might have ended up later in life instead of shoehorning her into “flying Dazzler” would have been one step towards a more interesting story.

    And RAMA KUSHNA! Yet another chick superhero as a lesbian? That was tired even before “the goddamned Batwoman” came along.

    Someone please just get Power Pack back together. What’s next, Jack Power pops up in the New Warriors as a bi-curious comic book artist?

  4. Fredy
    July 9, 2007 at 7:05 pm — Reply

    this felt like an episode from “Beverly Hills” or somethin. Everyones whiny, barely over 25, hints of lesbianism, and drama queens. yeah im dropping this book, it felt like it lead no where

  5. Maximus Rift
    July 9, 2007 at 7:35 pm — Reply

    I’d rather see Ricochet or Mattie get a mini or get some kind of story time in the spider books.

    I’m not liking the whole Julie Power sexuality thing since it feel like it was tacked on to make her more interesting.

    I really want to like the book but it’s getting harder to do so. I also hope that we see them actually turn into a REAL hero team.

  6. Rowan
    July 9, 2007 at 8:50 pm — Reply

    I agree I am far more interested in Phil fighting or coping I guess with the goblin in him and what went on with pena….. Hollow yeah Hollow. I would like to see something more about them for sure

  7. Rowan
    July 9, 2007 at 8:53 pm — Reply

    One other thing , my theory is at the end of this storyline Phil goes wacko turns into the goblin again and ohh they finally unite and get less kissy face and more kick ass and fight him and then he will say after they give him a sound thrashing ” ohh man you guys did it you finally worked together or some stuff and now you cant be heroes because we are all gonna be arrested and shot with darts that strip us of our powers except you Julie because you will fly away to your rents and tottally surrender and get to stay as a family in the initiative yay for you, but isn’t that what we wanted from these meetings sans the being arrested and dying …… oh im dead”

  8. July 9, 2007 at 9:56 pm — Reply

    I really want to like the book but it’s getting harder to do so. I also hope that we see them actually turn into a REAL hero team.

    I’d settle for them stopping the whining and backbiting “You fell off the wagon” bull$#!+. It’s insulting to the characters and to anyone who ever needed an organization like Alcoholics Anonymous.

    There’s a lot of stuff that could be compelling here, but the execution isn’t getting it across.

  9. Starleafgirl
    July 10, 2007 at 12:56 am — Reply

    Wow, 1.5? Am I alone in actually liking this issue? I thought it did a better job of going where it intended to go and saying what it had to say on its topic than the last one.

    Maybe I like it so much just because it’s not your typical “let’s fly in and save the day, oo, let’s stick an explosion in there too, just for the hell of it” book. I really, really don’t mind the high exposition and “talkiness” of it.

    Sure, the Julie plot seemed too cliche when the director tried to collect on those “fringe benefits,” but I don’t mind all that much because I care far more for the Phil-Hollow plot than hers.

    That’s my main criticism with this issue: a lack of progression on the other subplots. But at least there were hints. And I could understand that he’d (C.B.) need to cut other stuff out to fit in everything he wanted to for the Julie plot. Geez, even my criticisms aren’t that bad.

    I mean, I like the book. And most of the characters, flawed as they are and certainly not your typical A-listers in spandex and capes, have grown on me. Even though I only bought this series for Penance. I mean, Hollow.

  10. Baal
    July 10, 2007 at 1:33 am — Reply

    I have no problem with Julie turning lesbo since I’m tired of characters returning who haven’t changed one bit since theyw ere last seen.

    There’s also a problem with Nekra attacking the team since the woman was first taken down by Shanna the She-Devil. Come on. You should never have any street cred after that.

  11. July 10, 2007 at 2:06 am — Reply

    And that ‘Hollywood Julie’ panel in the last pic is so horrifying as to make me almost want to summon an exorcist.

  12. July 10, 2007 at 7:57 am — Reply

    Wow, 1.5? Am I alone in actually liking this issue? I thought it did a better job of going where it intended to go and saying what it had to say on its topic than the last one.

    So do I. Last issue got 1 star. :)

    Maybe I like it so much just because it’s not your typical “let’s fly in and save the day, oo, let’s stick an explosion in there too, just for the hell of it” book. I really, really don’t mind the high exposition and “talkiness” of it.

    I don’t mind talking heads in a comic… One of my favorite off-brand series in recent years was “Common Grounds,” a book which essentially consisted of people sitting in a coffee shop and jabbering. The problem for me comes in the WAY the exposition is done, a very “90210” we’re-trying-to-create-a-new-persona-to-change-our-life feeling. We suspect that Phil doesn’ want to use his powers because they’re driving him mad, and Ricochet joined the group because of guilt about Hornet’s death, but there’s not a lot of explanation as to WHY the others are there.

    Sure, the Julie plot seemed too cliche when the director tried to collect on those “fringe benefits,” but I don’t mind all that much because I care far more for the Phil-Hollow plot than hers.

    I didn’t mind Julie’s After-School Special nearly as much as I was bothered by the unrealistic setup. If the “dream job” had been something that started earlier in the series, and had a realistic arc to it rather than a high-school student’s idea of what being in movies is like, I might’ve felt differently.

    That’s my main criticism with this issue: a lack of progression on the other subplots. But at least there were hints. And I could understand that he’d (C.B.) need to cut other stuff out to fit in everything he wanted to for the Julie plot. Geez, even my criticisms aren’t that bad.

    “Lack of progression” is kind of a buzzword here. It may not come across well, but I’m not faulting C.B. for what he’s doing with the characters, as most of that is working for me. Ricochet’s guilt, Julie’s double-life, Phil’s emotional problems and concern for a complete stranger, the Mickey/Chris relationship, all these points are interesting and work for me. The execution, however, makes it feel like they’re all crowded together, clamoring for your attention. Then we get to things that don’t work for me at all, like Mickey’s interactions with the drug-dealer last month, and the somewhat silly movie-set sequence in this issue… There’s a lot to like, but there are enough problems to come very close to overwhelming the good bits, especially when we’re talking about spending three dollars a month on the title…

    I mean, I like the book. And most of the characters, flawed as they are and certainly not your typical A-listers in spandex and capes, have grown on me. Even though I only bought this series for Penance. I mean, Hollow.

    And that may be why we have differing perspectives. I am familiar with Turbo and Lightspeed (coincidentally, both the names of seasons of Power Rangers) and have a passing acquaintance with Darkhawk and Ricochet. I know nothing about Phil Urich that I didn’t read on the wiki, and I could never make heads or tails of the Penance history in Generation X… It may be a question of what characters you expect to see written in a certain way. F’rinstance, maybe it’s a question of my attitudes, but I don’t mind seeing Julie Power’s implied lesbianism (an old friend informed me that “lesbo” makes her want to kill. And her wife too.) but I suspect it’s the kind of development that won’t stick around after C.B. is done with this series. Marvel is still printing kid-friendly Power Pack comics, after all, and most of us still think of Julie as a ten-year-old girl. I figure the next time we see Julie, they’ll gloss over any mention of her solo career, (just as they did with Alex, post-New Warriors) de-age her, and ignore any sexual connotations. Unless she ends up dating Spider-Woman by the end of this series (a development that wouldn’t really surprise me, given the way the book has gone thus far.)

  13. Starleafgirl
    July 10, 2007 at 11:21 am — Reply

    “And that ‘Hollywood Julie’ panel in the last pic is so horrifying as to make me almost want to summon an exorcist.” ~ Salieri (doing it this way because I’m not sure how to do italics in this set up.)

    Salieri, I think it was totally meant to; she was playing it up for them to emphasis the difference between it and the real her. If it makes things better, that’s probably the last we’ll see of Hollywood Julie. ;)

    Which goes for Mark I., too. Yes, the “new” Julie Power was different, but she meant it to be that way, because it was just an act, and, as you know, she’s decided to drop the act. Before you write off Julie written by C.B., I’d suggest you’d give the Julie that we’ll (hopefully) see in issues #5 and #6.

    To Matthew Peterson, yeah, I don’t mind seeing Julie’s implied lesbianism too. Let’s face it, it’s a part of our population (and has been since civilization began) and always will be; gay people should get some representation in comics, too. The only thing remains is to get some more gay male superheroes.

    And the last issue got 1 star? Hah, I must’ve put a mental block on that little fact; I was convinced it was also a 1.5. ;) Good, then I’m not completely crazy in thinking #4 was put together better than #3. :P I’ve found enjoyment in all the Loners books so far, btw (especially the first), but as with movies and TV shows, I’ve found that I’m easy to please. ;)

    “We suspect that Phil doesn’ want to use his powers because they’re driving him mad, and Ricochet joined the group because of guilt about Hornet’s death, but there’s not a lot of explanation as to WHY the others are there.” ~ Matthew Peterson

    Good point. Well, as of Loners #4, Julie’s reason is because she promised her parents that she wouldn’t use her powers out here in L.A. Of course, she lies so much that I automatically have trouble believing this is the real reason (I have a sister who lies a lot, so I’m naturally suspicious), but I’ll go with it since it probably is the reason. Mattie’s real reason should hopefully be uncovered in Loners #5 and #6, along with Turbo’s and Darkhawk’s; I don’t think C.B. would completely miss this aspect of the characters.

    As for Julie’s “dream job” not being set up earlier in the series, come on, in issue #1 she mentions her hopeful aspirations for an acting career. Yeah, the execution of the idea in issue #4 was rushed and unrealistic, but at least it wasn’t something that came completely out of the blue in the beginning of #4. Keep in mind she was stuck in the hospital for issue #3.

    Although, just before the meeting in issue #1, when she was on the phone, the whole acting career thing might’ve been really talking about her lesbianism but just didn’t want to say that to the whole group. If, that is, she really is a lesbian. Anyway, her whole acting kick has been mentioned since at least Loners #1; I’m not familiar with Excelsior’s run in Runaways.

    Although, I will say (I got this from a couple of other people on Newsarama who said the same thing), that Karolina and Julie might’ve gotten their flirt on, even way back then. At the very least, it proves that Julie doesn’t mind that sort of attention. ;)

    Julie: Don’t try anything funny, girlfriend, or I’ll–
    Karolina: Wow. You are really, really pretty.
    Julie: Oh… thanks? I mean, you’re pretty, too.
    Karolina: Seriously?
    Julie: Yeah, I like how your hair glows and–OWF! *gets hit by a flying “Chamber”*
    Karolina: Molly! I was talking to her!
    Molly: Sorry, K! The flaming trenchcoat guy was trying to burn me with his face!

    “The execution, however, makes it feel like they’re all crowded together, clamoring for your attention.” ~ Matthew Peterson

    Hmm, yeah, come to think of it, it does seem like that (not that I minded whilst I was reading it, apparently, heh); and that’s why you said what you said about there being more than six issues worth of story crammed into this miniseries. Well, if you can let go of that, I could suggest you take it as many stories are happening simultaneously and we only get to see bits and pieces of the others as the focus shifts.

    I really hope they don’t do all that (what you said, Matt) with Julie. Sigh. ^_^;;

  14. Mark I.
    July 10, 2007 at 4:05 pm — Reply

    I haven’t so much changed my mind as I’ll take Starleafgirl’s words and apply them towards hope for something better. I, too, don’t mind a lesbian or gay character if presented in a thoughtful and respectful way, but all too often it’s simply tacked on, almost a cheat really, with the hopes that it will flesh out a less developed character without having to do anything deeper than “oh, hey, if we make *Character X* a lesbian, she’ll be more interesting.” Bah. I’m too old to be overly aroused by two female drawings talking about making out. (But not too old for comics! Conundrum…)

    I realize this is a team book and you can’t focus six complete issues in a row on one single character on a team book (unless it’s Wolverine or Batman, history sez) but I just hope this isn’t the creative team taking a long look at Julie Power and saying “hmm…Lightspeed…moves fast. Kids book…BORING…wait…she leaves a rainbow trail, hmm…rainbow…gay…lesbian! Okay, Julie’s covered, moving on…”

    No matter how “respectful” or “thoughtful” a lesbian character is–even if a woman’s writing her–the danger is of course that the lesbianism is used as subconscious (or worse, blatant) tittilation for the overwhelmingly male demographic that purchases comic books. I’m not against the sight of two attractive women kissing, after all I am unabashedly male and therefore easily amused and distracted by female sexuality. However, even as someone who is susceptible to the trick, I can recognize exploitation when I see it. Tasteful exploration of a lesbian character is fine and dandy. Constant “horny” dialogue and sneaking bedroom shots of two scantily clad comic book heroines who are invariably built like Maxim models takes it into a different territory. Obviously that hasn’t happened here yet, but the clumsy dialogue surrounding it sounds like a warning sign for things to come.

    In spite of my benign prejudice against homosexuality (I have gay friends on both sides of the fence, I just don’t understand a same-sex preference and will never attempt to,) the trend favoring lesbians over gay men in comics is as clear as the trend in movies and television of today: lesbianism can sell and is losing its “taboo” status…largely because the men who control the money in that world love seeing two hot chicks “go at it.” Hey, money talks, and most guys would rather pay to see “Wild Things” than “Queer as Folk.” Meanwhile, gay men are given “dignified” portrayals at times (read: GLAAD is thrown a bone,) but by and large are desexualized in most mainstream depictions, either as mincing artistic types or wailing “queens” whose sexual comments are taken about as seriously as Tyler Perry dressed as “Madea,” and yes, that is an intentional comparison.

    Anyway, point is, if a publisher wants to defend having all sorts of lesbians popping up in recent comics as “realistic” and “respectful” it has to go both ways (no pun intended) and actually be realistic about it. The ratio of male heroes and villains to female is something like, what, 70-30? 60-40? Yet how many more lesbians are there than gay male characters? I don’t have time to add them up but I’m sure the former outweighs the latter. Like Kyle Broslofski said: “Either all of it is okay, or none of it is.”

    So I’ll give the book a pass until it gets to 10-12 issues…but it really needs to be tightened up. I’m sure the writer is capable of doing so–the job must have been awarded based on higher quality than that which has been seen in LONERS so far. Sorry if I’ve been a little acidic regarding the book, but I always had a weakness for the “Power Pack” characters since it was one of my favorite regular reads as a kid.

  15. July 10, 2007 at 4:54 pm — Reply

    Sorry if I’ve been a little acidic regarding the book, but I always had a weakness for the “Power Pack” characters since it was one of my favorite regular reads as a kid.

    Meh. Something that I realized a long time ago is that everybody has favorites, and everyone gets attached to “their characters.” And no matter how much Joey Da Q and Dan Didio want it to be different, any change will cause controversy, and we, as readers, are well within our rights as consumers of DC & Marvel (& Image & Dark Horse & Virgin & Devil’s Due & AC Comics, et al) to voice that displeasure.

    If more Loners is forthcoming, as the sellouts might indicate, then I will probably sign on to read it. My harsh words, like yours, are due as much to the WAY the stories are being told rather than the stories themselves. And as last issue so aptly proved, one piece that doesn’t work (i.e. we have a Japanese girl, she’s Yakuza!) can bring down the whole thing. Honestly, if Johnny & Julie’s foray into Hollywood hadn’t been such a farce, I could have brought this issue up a full star, mebbe even a star and a half, depending on prevailing winds and cheese whiz.

  16. Starleafgirl
    July 12, 2007 at 8:33 pm — Reply

    I tend to make decisions based on cheese whiz, too. … *grin*

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