flashmovie2.jpgAs Major Spoilers reported yesterday David (Batman Begins) Goyer is out on The Flash movie from Warner. Who is replacing him? Shawn Levy has stepped on board to direct the flick.

Now let’s take a look at Levy’s track record for films. Most recently he directed Night at the Museum which made it to number one at the box office (during a time that is generally dead for major releases). Levy also directed Cheaper by the Dozen and The Pink Panther. Does this mean we’ll be seeing Steve Martin don the red tights?

Levy has no intention of making “Flash” a comedy but is aiming for a lighter movie than previous Warners comic book adaptations, such as “Batman Begins” and “Superman Returns.” Goyer’s “Flash” also had been dark-themed.

Levy will oversee the writing of the new draft, and it is believed elements of Goyer’s script will be used in the development process.

This is probably the worst news I’ve heard all morning. While I did like how Wally West was written in the Cartoon Network Justice League series, there is enough going on under that cowl to make a darker themed movie more appropriate. Even the Flash television series was somewhat serious even though there were lighter moments. Noting Levy’s film record “light” means comedy, and Levy comedy means slapstick, and slapstick comedy means Major Suckage as far as I’m concerned.

What do you think? Will this movie tank before it even makes it out of the gate?

via Hollywood Reporter (link)

The Author

Stephen Schleicher

Stephen Schleicher

Stephen Schleicher began his career writing for the Digital Media Online community of sites, including Digital Producer and Creative Mac covering all aspects of the digital content creation industry. He then moved on to consumer technology, and began the Coolness Roundup podcast. A writing fool, Stephen has freelanced for Sci-Fi Channel's Technology Blog, and Gizmodo. Still longing for the good ol' days, Stephen launched Major Spoilers in July 2006, because he is a glutton for punishment.

You can follow him on Twitter @MajorSpoilers and tell him your darkest secrets...

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4 Comments

  1. February 5, 2007 at 2:38 pm — Reply

    Well, there’s two modes of thought here. The first is that The Flash doesn’t have the built-in casual audience who knows him that well. Sure there are a couple hundred thousand comics fans who’ll be around, but for the most part, the public doesn’t have a lot of in-depth knowledge of the Flash, so they’ll be free to do something interesting, and maybe even something totally unexpected with the character, giving us an entertaining take on the Flash.

    The second is the dark thought that DC/Warner’s is dealing in properties, and properties only. Superman Returns seems to underline this, in that they don’t really have a lot of stake in the characters or story, so long as it sells. Given that The Flash has been, historically speaking, one of the less dark and gritty guys around, I don’t MIND them taking a less overtly grim tone.

    But I also agree with you, Stephen, in that in the mind of Hollywood, “funny” usually comes out as “ridiculous,” and given that we’re dealing with a character whose power is, in most people’s minds, “runnin’ fast,” I suspect we’re going to see a movie that borders on parody.

    Sad state of affairs, this…

  2. February 5, 2007 at 3:30 pm — Reply

    I totally wouldn’t care if it were humorous AND good. But I have a feeling it will devolve into self mockery and come off as a super joke. Flash being one of my favorite characters, I wouldn’t want to see this happen at all.

    But hey, I’m not a multimillionaire, and until Warner calls me up with a great directing gig, I’ll just have to see what comes out of it.

  3. February 5, 2007 at 5:10 pm — Reply

    A Flash slapstick – Yuch!!
    A Flash with humor – excellent.
    I don’t trust Hollywood to know the difference.

    THE classic piece of humor placed in a superhero movie is when Clark looks at the telephone on the pole with no booth to change in (Superman I). It’s funny for those that catch it, but it doesn’t hit you over the head if you don’t (like canned laughter).

    James

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