Robin #156 – The High Dive

by

robin156picon.jpgreviewbubble.jpgOr – Today, on a very special Robin

I haven’t reviewed Robin in a while; not because the issues were bad- quite the contrary, the series since One Year Later has been a real treat, rather, I’ve been dealing with a lot lately. For Robin, coming back to Gotham and dealing with all the changes, takes a lot out of him. But he’s not the only one with problems in this very special issue of Robin.

01.jpgRobin #156
The High Dive
Adam Beechen (w)
Freddie E. Williams II (a), Guy Major (c), Phil Balsman (l)

Robin’s had a rough couple of years, with those closest to him being killed; his parents, girlfriend, best friend, even his comrade turned to the dark side. Heck, even his most recent girlfriend is upset with him because he didn’t call after the kidnapping events of last issue.

IMAGE REMOVED BY DC LEGAL DEPARTMENT

Robin heads off to the Gotham General Meta-Injuries Ward to check in on Dodge, who last issue, was put into a coma when he got in the way of Robin doing his work. Just prior to the events of Infinite Crisis, Batman, Robin, and generally any meta-human were hunted down as criminals, yet now, they are welcomed back as casually as if nothing happened.

When he goes into the room, he is confronted by Mike’s parents, who don’t blame him in the least for what has happened.

IMAGE REMOVED BY DC LEGAL DEPARTMENT

Jeez, talk about a guilt trip.

Leaving the hospital and swinging around the city, Robin comes across a young man standing on the edge of a building. Yup, he’s depressed and ready to jump. Robin steps in and for the rest of the issue, the two discuss the problems the young man is having, and talking about alternatives to suicide.

“A whole issue that is nothing more than an After School Special? How boring is that?”

Actually, it is completely opposite dear reader. I know many people who have gone through times in their lives much like the young man in this issue, and Beechen does an excellent job of writing dialogue that deals with the subject in a serious way. Beechen didn’t even give the young man a name, making him the Everyman readers can identify with.

Since the issue is mostly talking things out, one would think there wouldn’t be much in the way of art. Again, that person would be wrong. Williams and Balsman do an excellent job of using cinematic angles and shots to tell the story and keep it interesting and fresh throughout the entire issue.

It wouldn’t be much of an issue if the young man had actually jumped off the building to his death, so it is good to see Robin was able to talk him down and convince him to talk to someone who will listen.

IMAGE REMOVED BY DC LEGAL DEPARTMENT

At one point in their conversation, Robin admits he also has someone he can talk to who will take the time to listen when he is having problems. The issue ends with Dick Grayson picking up the phone and talking with Tim.

As good as this issue is that After School Special message kept flashing in the back of my mind. Yes, depression and suicide are big issues that need to be addressed, and if this issue helps saves one person, then great. Perhaps because the message was so blatant in its delivery, I was slightly turned off. Because of this, I have to knock half a star from my overall rating, giving Robin #156 4.5 Stars.

45stars.jpg

Parting Shot

Hey, things aren’t totally bad for Tim!

05.jpg

Dear DC,
You know your books would be much more fun to read if you didn’t have that god awful 10 page Teen Titans/Spark Top AD in the middle of your books. Please stop.